1940s Mido Multi-Centerchrono Telemetre

£7,950.00Price
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  • Brand - Mido

    Model - Multicenter-chrono

    Reference - N/A

    Year - 1941

    Serial -  xxxx

    Movement - 1300

    Case materiel - Stainless steel, unpolished case

    Diameter - 35 mm excuding crown

    Accessories - handmade leather strap

  • The Mido Multicenter-chrono is a watch that has been hunted by us for some time, largely due to its intricate asthetics, it seemed a near impossible task to find one in really good original condition. Well, we managed to this time!! A we are delighted to present this one here.

    Available for sale is one of the more elegant and interesting chronographs we have seen for some time. 

    From the smaller case dimensions it seems to pack in a world of detail and craftmenship. The foil rose gilt scales and black dial with constrasting scales and inner red 24hr numerals are really the highlight of this watch.

    That said the case, made by Francois Borgel under Taubert carries with it a one piece case amd 10 sided case back allowing it to be dust proof and waterproof at that time.

    The case is actually quite robust and antimagnetic. The star engraved pushers are actually the same used on the Patek Philippe references 1463 and 1563.

    The Multicenter aspect of the name is in the fact that it doesn't use any sub dials like a convential chronograph but is all in the central part of the dial. Their slogan being “Here is the only chronograph that looks like a handsome watch,” which certainly is true when looking at this design.

    The scales were clever in that they could determine not only the time of an event to be measured but also the average speeds reached.

    Quote; The Mido also has a telemeter scale, which can be used to accurately assess the distance of an incident by timing the journey of its sound. This was an essential tool in the First and Second World Wars. A commanding officer could start the chronograph when he saw a flash of artillery and then stop it when he heard the sound of the explosion.

    This would tell them how far away the enemy was so they could plot their positions easier.

    The thinking mans watch as they say!